Make your own free website on Tripod.com
 Sleep Apnea, Snoring, Narcolepsy,
Insomnia and Other Sleep Disorders.

THE SLEEP SITE

SLEEP APNEA:
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS AND COMPLICATIONS-[2]

 

OTHER MEDICAL CONDITIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SLEEP APNEA

There are many. They include:

-CONDITIONS THAT COMPROMISE AIRWAY PATENCY AND ADEQUACY OF BREATHING: such as a deviated nasal septum, allergic rhinitis, adenotonsillar hypertrophy, disproportionate upper airway anatomy (ex: elongated soft palate, large tongue, mandibular deficiency/class II occlusion), masses of the upper airway, kyphoscoliosis, abdominal obesity, diaphragmatic/palatal/vocal cord paralysis, various neuromuscular disorders including different types of muscular dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy and post-polio syndrome, various syndromes of dwarfism, Down syndrome, Prader Willi syndrome, Shy Drager syndrome.

-VARIOUS ENDOCRINE DISORDERS: including hypothyroidism, acromegaly and Cushing's syndrome.

-CONDITIONS THAT DECREASE CARDIAC OUTPUT: such as atrial fibrillation, cardiomyopathies and congestive heart failure--at least in part due to the deleterious impact of delayed circulation time on the neural control of breathing. Also, patients with Cheyne Stokes breathing frequently experience collapse of the upper airway in sleep, during their crescendo increases in ventilatory effort. It has been established that the treatment responsiveness of chronic congestive heart failure is often dramatically improved by treatment of the patient's concurrent sleep apnea syndrome.

-PULMONARY DISEASE: often associated with sleep apnea as an aggravating factor, since the magnitude of sleep-related desaturations will be worsened by low baseline oxgen saturations in wakefulness. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been associated with apneas in REM sleep. Oxygen administration will sometimes increase the duration of apneas occurring in that specific sleep stage.

-IN MANY PATIENTS, THOUGH: A PHYSICAL EXAMINATION IN WAKEFULNESS WILL PROVE ENTIRELY NORMAL--OR AT MOST, REFLECTIVE OF THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE BREATHING FAILURE THAT STILL REMAINS HIDDEN IN THE NIGHT. Healthy in wakefulness; critically ill during sleep.


When severe, sleep apnea can kill patients.

To make matters worse, in the absence of potentially lethal cardiac dysrhythmias, it appears likely to do so slowly--at high cost, with progressive disability, with immense human suffering, and frequently, with concurrent risk to the health and safety of others as well.

Even in the busiest of practices, it is possible to detect sleep apnea and avert disaster in a large percentage of cases.


How can physicians ensure detection and effective care of sleep apnea?


 

 THE SLEEPSITE NAVIGATOR MENU
 

COLUMBUS COMMUNITY HEALTH
REGIONAL SLEEP DISORDERS CENTER
Accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Robert W. Clark, M.D., Medical Director
1430 South High Street
Columbus OH 43207

Tel: [614] 443-7800

Fax: [614] 443-6960

e-mail: flamenco@netexp.net

 © Copyright 2006 Robert W. Clark M.D. Inc.